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design-is-fine:

Roundhouse for 32 locomotives at Nevers, 1860. Bourbonnais Railway. Photo by Auguste Hippolyte Collard, France. Getty Museum

design-is-fine:

Roundhouse for 32 locomotives at Nevers, 1860. Bourbonnais Railway. Photo by Auguste Hippolyte Collard, France. Getty Museum

fuckyeahmobydick:

Bill Pettit’s Moby Dick Collection

One man’s obsession with an obsession. A library of editions of Moby Dick, collected over 25 years, comprising more than 200 volumes spanning more than 100 years of printing.

Hats off to Bill…

Makes my ‘collection’ of 4 copies look pretty gash…

People make Glasgow

People make Glasgow

Cumbernauld

Cumbernauld

You know you have a problem when you buy a book despite already owning it, just to ‘rescue’ it from a charity shop

You know you have a problem when you buy a book despite already owning it, just to ‘rescue’ it from a charity shop

Playing around with Hipstamatic on my brother’s iphone. Incredibly jealous it’s not available on Android…

Aug 2
design-is-fine:

Christopher Dresser, watering can, 1876. Painted tinned-iron. Manufactured by Richard Perry, Son & Company, wolverhampton, England. MoMA collection

design-is-fine:

Christopher Dresser, watering can, 1876. Painted tinned-iron. Manufactured by Richard Perry, Son & Company, wolverhampton, England. MoMA collection

design-is-fine:

Christoper Dresser, Tea Kettle with stand and Egg Steamer, 1879-80. Silver with ebony handle.

Christopher Dresser (1834-1904) was one of the most talented British designers of the nineteenth century, and these teapots are rare survivals of the radical work he produced at the very peak of his powers.

Dresser was an industrial designer before the profession had been invented, a man who found new ways of designing for production that few of his contemporaries could have imagined. He grasped both the properties of materials and the processes of production and adapted his designs and aesthetics to them brilliantly. Dresser worked for a large and varied number of manufacturers and created designs for silver plate, cast iron, furniture, ceramics and glass, as well as textiles, carpets and wallpapers.

Some now view his metalwork as an astonishing prefigurement of the Modernist designs of the Bauhaus, but his style is probably better understood as an extreme version of high Victorian aestheticism. V&A

design-is-fine:

Christoph Dresser, Kettle, 1880. London.

design-is-fine:

Christoph Dresser, Kettle, 1880. London.

design-is-fine:

Christopher Dresser, chair, 1880-83. London. Mahogany. Manufactured by Chubb & Co. for the Art Furnishers’ Alliance. Photography © Victoria and Albert Museum

According to a sale catalogue of 1883, this chair was originally intended for a drawing room or boudoir.The chair is made of mahogany rather than a cheaper timber such as deal or pine, which were normally used for painted furniture.

Dresser’s interest in Japanese design can be seen in the ebonised finish and unusual combination of vertical and diagonal uprights in the back of this chair. As Art Editor of ‘The Furniture Gazette’, he illustrated some of his own furniture designs, including this chair, in February 1880.